The Royal Albert Hall Now Has Its Own Walk Of Fame

Royal Albert Hall

Shove off, Hollywood, because we’ve got the Royal Albert Hall.

Fickle thing, fame. You never know whether your name will be glorified forever, or whether your time as flavour of the month simply presages a slide into obscurity. Well, eleven famous names are being inscribed into the very fabric of London itself, ensuring long-lived notoriety, as the Royal Albert Hall inducts them into its new Walk of Fame today.

Royal Albert Hall
Photo: @pauldugdale

Like the Hollywood Walk of Fame, but a little more selective, the Royal Albert Hall’s version will honour those who’ve left an imprint on the venue in some way. The first stone goes to Queen Victoria, as tribute to the monarch who laid the foundation stone back in 1867. Frankly, it isn’t the most original decision, but then again the hall is named after her husband, so go figure.

Royal Albert Hall
Photo: @royalalberthall

As you’d expect, there’s a host of musicians and entertainers gaining a place – Eric Clapton, Shirley Bassey, Adele, and Muhammad Ali amongst the names to appear. Others left their mark on history in different ways, with Winston Churchill, Albert Einstein, and the Suffragettes honoured with a place. The Class of 2018 will be joined by more as the years go on, and there’s plenty of space on the pavement. Maybe it’s time you tried to book yourself in for a performance?

See it at 

Featured image: @aliceguy

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